Tudor Remedial Services

Peter Lynk Decorating Contractor
Peter Lynk Decorating Contractor

Tudor Remedial Services has 30 Years experience in remedial treatments and its success is due to its qualified staff and knowledge within the remedial industry. We have established a good working relationship with clients, such as Borough Councils, Housing Societies, Estate Agents, Developers, Public Schools and Buildings, Residential and Commercial Management, Resturants, Public Houses, Building Societies and the Private Sectors.

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The common furniture beetle (Anobium punctatum)

HABITAT

Softwoods and european hard woods, especially, birch,

used in plywood. Sap wood is mostley affected, but heart wood

can also be effected when wood rot is present. The recentley formed

sap wood with a higher nitrogen content is prefered. The level of larva growth decreses towards the older sap wood where the nitrogen content is less. This insect is frequently found in old furniture or unfinished surfaces such as, drawers, backs of cupboards, under tables etc. it is also found around loft accesses and under stairs and areas affected by damp and moisture content, which has influence on larva development. This insect is probably the most common domestic pest present in this country at this time.


IDENTIFICATION


The common furniture beetle is between 3-5mm long, it is dark brown with lines of pits (puncuations) along wing covers. Flight season is late march to early september. It is attracted to white surfaces. The larva of the common furniture beetle is up to 6mm long it is curved and a pale cream colour. It will remain at this stage for between 3-5 years. The emergence holes and tunnels are 1/2mm in diameter. They are of round orientation but mainly along the grain. The fraze or bore dust is gritty to feel between the fingers and pale cream coloured, containing lemon shaped faecal pellets.


TREATMENT

 

Contact our office for a survey and estimate.

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Death Watch Beetle (xestobium rufovillosum)

 

HABITAT


Sap wood and heart wood of hard wood, mainly oak, are particularly affected by decay. Although soft woods are occasionally damaged when in contact with infected hard wood. The beetle is found mainly in southern and central countries of England also in Wales, but not recorded in Scotland. The beetle mainly affects historic buildings, churches and stately homes, where oak and elm were used during construction. Although any hard wood timbers of a substantial age can be effected. The name Death Watch Beetle comes from the tapping sound made by the beetle in the early hours of the morning, known as the Death Watch. 


Dampness is essential and partial decayed timber promotes rapid infestation. The beetle is particularly found in areas prone to dampness, i.e. timber wall plates, joist ends and lintels, timber such as these that are built into the structure of the building. Damage can be severe when combined with Wet Rot, it can hollow out centres of large sections timbers to such an extent that treatment is not possible and re-newal is necessary.

 

IDENTIFICATION

 

The in insect is between 6-9mm long it is brown with patches of yellow oblique gold hairs. The larva are up to 9mm long, and have been recorded to have been present within timbers in excess of 10 years. They excavate tunnels which coalesce into honeycombed appearance. They are curved and pale cream with golden hair, occasionally found under damaged timber having fallen out. The emergence holes are round and are 3mm in diameter as are the tunnels, which are extensive and random. The fraze is gritty between the fingers, and pale cream colour. There are bun shaped faecal pellets packed in tunnels.

 

TREATMENT

Contact our office for further information.

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